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Vote for the leader not a party

Chances are that before school let out, sometime over the summer, and even now back at school you have started to discuss the presidential election.

While some people choose to vote only democrat or only republican, I choose to vote for who I believe is the best man or woman for the job.

But wait, you can’t do that, you have to stay with your party, blue or red until the day you
die! Sorry, but that isn’t how I view an election.

To me, the person being elected should not have their character based off of whether or not they are a democrat or republican, but rather who they are as a person, if they have a good plan, and what traits they have as a leader.

In all honestly, I have yet to make up my mind as to who I am going to vote for in this election. Barack Obama seems like a legitimate and honest person, but he also may not have the experience necessary to get the country back on its feet.

John McCain seems to have good energy ideas, but also he may turn into another Bush if his views mirror the current president’s too much.

So for me the decision has yet to be made.

There’s one thing I can say for sure though, the next president needs to do the right job. I could care less whether they are a republican, democrat, or even an independent.

Some people base their like or dislike of a candidate off of their party  position in the government. “Oh, well Obama is so far left I would never vote for him,” some may say.

I’ve also heard, “John McCain is a republican, we already had one of those for eight years, we don’t need another.” That argument really doesn’t make any sense, at least in my mind.

I used this example when talking to my grandmother of all people. She is what you would call a “hard-core” republican, so anything slightly democratic makes her skin crawl. She was wondering why I would ever vote for Barack Obama, mainly because of his position on the left. I gave her a simple scenario using religion.

I said, “ Pretend that my girlfriend is Jewish. I introduce her to you, and you like everything about her.

She’s nice, friendly, pretty, kind, good to me, anything a grandmother could want for her grandson.

But, when I tell you she is Jewish, all that goes out the window and you instantly do not like her. Now that doesn’t make a lot of sense, does it?”

She looked at me and answered, “Well, I guess not. Religion shouldn’t matter in something like that. If she is a good person, it shouldn’t matter what religion she follows. But what does that have to do with anything?”

“Well, you said that religion shouldn’t matter. If she is a good person that is what counts.

Now, what if Barack Obama was a great guy and really well-qualified for president, should the fact that he is a democrat completely discredit him? While politics isn‘t a religious choice, you can see where I‘m coming from right?” I asked.

Just as a disclaimer, my grandmother does not hate Jewish people. It was just an example, so no worries. Her response was, well, non-existent.

I hope she understood what I was talking about. Hopefully the readers of this article understand my point.

It should not matter what party a person belongs to; donkey and elephant should not be the deciding factor.

If they are well qualified, a good person, and honest, that is what really counts.

So don’t vote just because the person is a democrat or a republican. Vote for the person who is right for the job.