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Choosing to live in a residence hall isn't as bad as it seems

Freshman Shane McGrady rests in his room in Harbold Hall on Wednesday.  Harbold Hall is located in the South Residential Complex.  DJ RAMSAY/SNAPPER
Freshman Shane McGrady rests in his room in Harbold Hall on Wednesday. Harbold Hall is located in the South Residential Complex. DJ RAMSAY/SNAPPER
Chances are, if you attend Millersville, you have lived in a dorm. Some may be still be living in one. Most people believe living in a dorm is terrible, but it is really not.

Sure, you hear the usual horror stories of alcoholic roommates, risky-business in the bunk below you, and the nasty showers; but for the most part, they are just that; stories. Living in a dorm is actually a good thing. When you move in, you move in with a countless number of people you have probably never met before. Being thrown into this jumble of people can make for some interesting, yet lasting, friendships.

Out of everyone else, freshmen have the biggest adjustment. Francisco Zavala, a Freshman living in Leinhardt, recently stated, “The hardest part for me was laundry.”

For others, the big adjustment is living with a complete stranger. Mike Kiak, a freshman living in Gaige, recently said his biggest adjustment was, “Living with a new person for sure, [it was] just hard to get used to.”

International Education Week

Kiak continued, “And the fact that I have to walk all the way to the Upper Deck to get food on weekends. It’s such an inconvenience.”

For everyone else, the biggest problem is simply moving in. At the beginning and end of every semester, there is a mad rush to move in. Move in/out days could easily be some of the most stressful of the semester.

Another misconception about living in a dorm is that every Resident Assistant (RA) is mean and unfair. This is simply not true. RAs are students, too. They understand the pressures of college, and are not out to get you.

There is one thing that may be hard for you to get used to: the rowdy people down the hall. Every wing of every hall has them, and the truth is you are going to just have to get used to them. That being said, even the rowdy people have to quiet down for “quiet hours.” Excessive noise is not allowed in any dorm between 10 pm and 8 am Sunday through Thursday, and midnight to 8 am Friday and Saturday.

Another common gripe about dorm rooms is that they are small, cramped, tiny, and minuscule; the list of adjectives could go on and on. The truth is, if you keep the clutter contained you will have plenty of room.

Rachel Olszewski, a Gaige resident, warns, “Don’t just throw stuff in your room, claiming you’ll clean it up later. You won’t, and it adds up quickly.”

As we reach spring room selection, remember this: Dorm life is not that bad!