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Collage Menage exhibit this past week

In the famous words of poet Ralph Waldo Emerson, “the creation of beauty is art.” In other words beauty can be expressed through various forms of artistic attributes such as traditional art, music and dance. The importance of art can be compared to the importance of basic necessities such as food and water. In a sense, art is a sentimental value that not only allows us to enter another world but is also beneficial for the sake of our civilization.

On March 22, Millersville hosted an exhibition titled, “Collage Menage,” held at the Ganser Gallery from 5-7 p.m. The exhibit explored and demonstrate principles of creativity. The exhibit featured collages from different academic departments, as well as those from community members. Students from JP McCaskey high school, for example, had their art work featured along with a 92-year-old hospice woman whose writings that were written for her children. Under the coordination of Ty Clever and hosted by professor Mimi Shapiro, a specialist in book arts and poetry, the exhibit was a success with many observers stopping by, admired by the masterpieces within the exhibit.

“I was asked if I wanted to do a show, so I phoned all of my friends to be in this show,” Shapiro said. With limited supplies, Shapiro used what she had in terms of props, creating installations that were meant to make people think a little, evoking an idea that the audience can view and translate for themselves. One installation featured an iron board, surrounded by painted CD’s and pictures of “Mona Lisa.” One could assume that this reflected the industrious female, and the importance of the “Mona Lisa” in society.

Another installation that intrigued me the most was a replica of book shelves, surrounded by many books with unique meaning. By using the title of the book as a reference, Shapiro created three dimensional pieces reflecting her interpretation on what the title meant. Each book was sealed with an object embedded in it. Most of the artwork was for sale, and the event was free to the general public.