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The Tea Party embellishes new thought

Has anyone heard of this Tea Party movement? It is really quite an extraordinary thing. They basically work on the position of anti-stimulus, deficit, bailout and health reform. Before I go too far, let me give you a quick history of the movement. I am taking this from Wikipedia, but, “The theme of the Boston Tea Party, an iconic event of American history, has long been used by anti-tax protesters with Libertarian and conservative viewpoints. It was part of Tax Day protests held throughout the 1990s and earlier. The libertarian theme of the “tea party” protest was previously used by Republican Congressman Ron Paul and his supporters as a fundraising event during the primaries of the 2008 presidential campaign to emphasize Paul’s fiscal conservatism, which they later claimed laid the groundwork for the modern-day Tea Party movement.” Now that we have that settled, let us move on.

Back in the day, (which was a Wednesday), protests were initiated by members of either the Republican or Democratic national parties. There were never really large sized protests by independent groups, such as the Tea Party members. The whole dynamic of the protest and protestor changed when the movement emerged. This caused a firestorm in the Obama administration.

On April 19, 2009, Senior White House Advisor David Axelrod, when asked about the Tea Party protests on CBS News, said “I think any time that you have severe economic conditions, there is always an element of disaffection that can mutate into something that’s unhealthy.” and “The thing that bewilders me is this president just cut taxes for 95 percent of the American people. So I think the tea bags should be directed elsewhere, because he certainly understands the burden that people face.” Ohhh David Axelrod, what a guy. Obviously he and Barack are down with the in-crowd of “average Joe” Americans.

The most interesting thing about the Tea Party movement so far is that they have become, like the Green Party, their own political party which goes against liberal and some conservative ideas. I can not recall, off the top of my head, another time when a protest group grew into its own political party and not vice versa.

I think the overwhelming surge of interest and popularity helped to secure their spot in political movement history. There are now national conventions devoted to the tea party, big name speakers who advocate for them (i.e. Sarah Palin, etc.) all of which are really starting to give some validity to their claims. Enough so they can not as easyly be swept under the rug, like the 9-12 movement. But that is a different story.

What I am really getting at here in this article is the fact that a protest became a movement which became a party and not the other way around. It is something new and fresh, which is exactly what people are looking for and if they deny it, they are lying right to your face.