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Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

Tea Party embellishes new thought

Carson

We didn’t need much organization for the love-ins in the 60s when we would all meet in the local parks. We still managed to get the issues of the day discussed.
I feel the reason behind most of our troubles and the need for TEA Parties is the government’s ability to print up whatever money it wants to get their way.
Maybe this will help make the danger of fiat money clear. Imagine you and me are setting across from each other. We create enough money to represent all of the world’s wealth. Each one of us has one SUPER Dollar in front of him.
You own half of everything and so do I. I’m the government though. I get bribed into creating a Central Bank.
You’re not doing what I want you to be doing so I print up myself eight more SUPER Dollars to manipulate you with. All of a sudden your SUPER Dollar only represents one tenth of the wealth of the world!
That isn’t the only thing though. You need to get busy and get to work because YOU’VE BEEN STIFFED with the bill for the money I PRINTED UP to get YOU TO DO what I WANTED.
That to me represents what has been happening to the economy, and us, and why so many of our occupations just can’t keep up with the fake money presses.
They have been beating us with our own stick!!!!

Rebuttall: Affirmative Action, Part 2

Clayton

Affirmative action is supposed to help minorities gain acceptance into colleges and acquire jobs. But should they receive these at the expense of others? The legislators who enacted affirmative action laws are high ranking members of society: These law makers are all Ivy league graduates. They have “unofficial” acceptances ready for their kids to get into college. So enforcing affirmative action laws doesn’t really affect them as much as the rest of the population. Would you rather have somebody else take your child’s seat in college if it were the only one left? Affirmative action is a step backward in progressing, the US is competing with a global market, in doing so we need the best people for the job, we need hard working people to move this country forward. I would accept affirmative action if it actually worked; a large portion of students with affirmative action acceptances still manage to fail in college, wasting the chance for someone else to succeed as well as wasting government and scholarship money.
I think if someone truly believes in affirmative action, or have direct links to slave holders, my suggestion is that you donate money to minorities, or perhaps give up your job if one is truly passionate about it, but by all means do not deny other people’s hard work. If a group of people want to move forward in society, they should stop blaming, hating, and playing victim, and start working hard. If you set your mind in the negative all the time, that will stop you from progressing anywhere.
The erosion of states rights

Shawn

States do not have rights; people do. Rights come from God. States have power that they derive from the “consent of the governed.” States can still “Regulate” arms. The only expectation will be that they do not “Infringe” upon the right of the people to keep and carry them. It’s to bad you haven’t researched the congressional records on the 14th amendment, much less the Founders statements on firearms.
Your story is “Off the Mark.”

Andrew Frechtling

Your argument is the same that a Ku Klux Klansman would have made in the post-Civil War south. Faced with a situation where freed slaves and Unionists were being disarmed and murdered by whites in the former Confederate states, Congress extended the protections of the Bill of Rights, including the right to bear arms, to all citizens regardless of which state law they lived under.
The Cruikshank decision was an attempt by the Supreme Court to roll back the effects of this, the Fourteenth Amendment.
Cruikshank is a permanent stain on American jurisprudence, and I predict McDonald will wash that stain out.

Frank

First, it is important to understand that states don’t have rights. They have powers granted — loaned — to them by we the people, in whom all government power originates.
Second, if states were presumed to be immunized against the restrictions levied upon the federal government, then (as you point out) it is not simply the Second Amendment which is at risk. The First Amendment, after all, begins: “Congress shall make no law…” Maryland may thus re-adopt its pre-Constitutional stance: “Only Catholics may vote, hold office, or own property.” In the deep south, the story would be slightly different.
Are you sure that’s where you want this to go?

Pride at MU: Coming out as a Bisexual

Jimbeau

I am also bi, and though I am 55 years old, I only began the process of coming out a couple of years ago. Like you, I always felt the attractions to both genders. What I would tell you now is that you should find a bi support and social group to join with. There is an enormous joy that comes from being understood, and for us, that mostly can only come from other bi folks. I am part of such a group (The Dallas Fort Worth Bi Network) that works to educate people about bi-sexuality, and to support bi-sexuals in coming out and being visible in the LGBT community and elsewhere.
There are friendly bi organizations that have been working on our issues for a long time, and new ones popping up all the time. Check Facebook and other online resources to find a group and get in touch. They are waiting to welcome and help you. It is good to be bi!

Jean Taylor

I understand you completely, I have had similar issues and I haven’t told my mother due to her strong Christian beliefs but it is funny to me because if she was so Christian she should be accepting of all things and love all things so I don’t get it.