Running for a cause

A previous Race Against Racism through Lancaster City in 2011.

Nicole Schaffer
Features Writer

If you want to break in your sneakers for a good cause this spring, consider participating in Lancaster’s fifteenth annual “Race Against Racism” event. This race is hosted by the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), whose goal is to raise funds for the organization’s racial advocacy programs.

A previous Race Against Racism through Lancaster City in 2011.
A previous Race Against Racism through Lancaster City in 2011.

This race will be held in Lancaster City on Saturday April 27 at 9 a.m. and begins and ends at Musser Park. Participants can walk or run a total of 5 kilometers or 3.1 miles and will follow a track that loops throughout Downtown Lancaster’s East Chestnut and North Lime Streets. Register for this event online at www.ywcalancaster.org, send in a registration form by mail, or come to the YWCA building by April 15 to pay the cheapest price; adults cost $25, and children 14 and under cost $10.
Consider registering with a group of people of six or more to qualify as a team. The designated team captain must register their group online, and the team with the largest number of people under one name will be given free tickets to a Barnstormers game. The top five male and female winners will win a cash prize, and top three winners of each age group will win non-cash prizes. An awards ceremony will take place afterwards, and the results of the test will be posted on the YWCA website.
If you have always wanted to run in a race but felt out of out of shape or unprepared, don’t allow this attitude to set you back. This excuse should not be the reason you decide not to participate in such a great event. Race day is not until the end of April, which gives you one month to mentally and physically prepare.
There are many ways you could be preparing for a race, and Azcentral.com offers several tips to help any beginner to run a 5k race.
1. Begin by just walking for 10-20 minutes during the first week. Once you can briskly walk a mile, start to alternate between walking and jogging for up to 20-30 minutes at a time, covering at least half a mile each day.

2013’s Race Against Racism signals the event’s fifteenth anniversary. The goal is to raise money for the Young Women’s Christian Association’s (YWCA) racial advocacy programs.
2013’s Race Against Racism signals the event’s fifteenth anniversary. The goal is to raise money for the Young Women’s Christian Association’s (YWCA) racial advocacy programs.

2. By the second week, begin to increase the amount of time you are jogging until you can jog for at least half a mile without stopping. When you can do this, start to incorporate running into your routine. Switch from jogging to running until you are able to run at least half a mile, and cover up to a mile a day between the two.
3. Incorporate a day of cross training where you chose an aerobic activity such as bicycling or swimming to offer a change in training. Continue to alternate between running and walking. If you run a mile, walk for the next half mile until you are able to start running again. Continue to do this until you are able to run two miles at a time.
4. For your last week begin by running a mile on the first day, and walking a half hour before and after this time. The second day, rest your body by doing a relatively easy training session of alternating between walking and running for a total of two miles. On the third day run for three miles with a half a mile walk in between each mile. Do this three mile session again another day of the week before the race.
Some final tips the website offers are to rest and eat a meal of carbohydrates such as pasta to fuel your body the day before the race and to realize that if you become tired during the race you can always walk for a bit. Now that you have a plan to prepare for this local event, make sure you register ahead of time and come ready to run for a great cause.