Organization Outbreak: Organizations break in new members

Julia Scheib
News Writer

Dozens of student organizations try to entice new members by giving away literature at Organization Outbreak.
Dozens of student organizations try to entice new members by giving away literature at Organization Outbreak.

“We’re just trying to get more people to get down, I guess, with the movement,” said junior Eric Mallory, who sat at the Millersville Concerned Men table at last Wednesday’s Organization Outbreak. This was an event put on by the Center for Student Involvement and Leadership (CSIL) that brought together dozens of Millersville’s student organizations outside the Student Memorial Center (SMC).
From a glance at their poster, the Concerned Men look like a fraternity: their values are “academics, community service, leadership, and brotherhood.” Mallory acknowledged this resemblance, saying that the Concerned Men are trying to counter the negative stereotypes that come to mind when you think of a fraternity, such as hazing.

Citamard, dramatic spelled backwards, members await to greet students in hopes of gaining new members.
Citamard, dramatic spelled backwards, members await to greet students in hopes of gaining new members.

Juniors and members of the Center for Health Education and Promotion at Millersville, Jennifer Perez and Karli Van Duzer, approached Mallory’s table, inviting him and his fellow Concerned Men to Take Back the Night, which is an event that takes “a stand to end sexual violence”, will take place on Sept. 25.
“We’d love to have you there,” said Perez.
Across the way, the Black Student Union (BSU) was making their presence known. When a boisterous cluster of kids walked up, they were informed of an upcoming ‘90s party sponsored by the BSU. “We are not only targeting the black community,” said junior Altavese Williams. “We’re striving for diversity.”

Organizations make themselves known to all members of the MU community.
Organizations make themselves known to all members of the MU community.

The Gender and Sexuality Alliance (Allies) took a similarly inclusive approach, billing the organization as, “Not the ‘gay’ club, but the acceptance club.” At the Allies table, a girl with a cloud of wavy hair tried to explain asexuality to a student over a generous pile of Dum-dums.
A bevy of fraternities and sororities, several Christian groups, a Jewish organization, the College Republicans, a number of cause-oriented clubs such as M.U. Helping Paws and Autism Speaks, professionally oriented groups like the Early Childhood Organization, the Pre-Law Society, and the Biology Club had displays along the walkway between Gordinier Hall and the SMC. Clubs organized around recreational pursuits such as Millersville Fencing and the Planeswalkers of Millersville, whose uniting factor is a love for the game of Magic the Gathering, will also be displayed along the walkway.
“I’m here for the free lollipops,” said junior and WIXQ D.J., Michael Currier. From an advertising perspective, said Currier, Organization Outbreak doesn’t make much sense.
“Ever heard of the concept of noise?” Currier asked. “This thing suffers from too much noise—too many organizations competing for attention, so it’s hard to focus.”

S.A.C. Ashley Tose- senior, Colin Gallen- senior, Alicia Good-senior, Maggie Johnson-junior and Kaitlyn Hickey-junior had a prize wheel for students to spin at the outbreak event.
S.A.C. Ashley Tose- senior, Colin Gallen- senior, Alicia Good-senior, Maggie Johnson-junior and Kaitlyn Hickey-junior had a prize wheel for students to spin at the outbreak event.

Many students at the event contradicted this observation, though when asked if past Organization Outbreaks had been productive, senior Colin Gallen of the Student Alumni Association (SAA) said, “Oh yes. Because of the last Organization Outbreak, we were able to almost double our members.”
The SAA aims to build school spirit on campus and connect current students with alumni. Members at the SAA table were all wearing matching khakis and polo shirts with the SAA motto. To an inquiring student, senior Ashley Tose said, “Everyone’s an alum from day one. Think about it.”