Ville turns pink for a day

Katie Pryor
Assoc. Arts & Culture Editor

Students playing “Rack Attack” where students had to stack 36 cups in a pyramid in one minute.
Students playing “Rack Attack” where students had to stack 36 cups in a pyramid in one minute.

Millersville University’s third annual Breast-a-Ville on Oct. 3 in the Student Memorial Center (SMC) Promenade was a No Phone Zone.
Traci Frantz was at this year’s Breast-a-Ville to help spread the message about the dangers of storing cell phones in bras. Her daughter, Tiffany, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 at the age of 21 years old with no family history of breast cancer.
Her cancer was along the area of her breast where she had stored her cell phone in her bra for six years, said Frantz. Through Tiffany’s story, people can become aware of the risk factors cell phones can have in causing breast cancer. Many girls have stated that they are going to kick the habit.

Students playing "Catchin' Some D's" at Breast-a-Ville, part of Wellness Week at Millersville University. The pink ducks were chosen to represent the color for Breast Cancer Awarness Month. The games at Breast-a-Ville and Wellness Week helped raise awareness for breast cancer screening and preventing breast cancer.
Students playing “Catchin’ Some D’s” at Breast-a-Ville, part of Wellness Week at Millersville University. The pink ducks were chosen to represent the color for Breast Cancer Awarness Month. The games at Breast-a-Ville and Wellness Week helped raise awareness for breast cancer screening and preventing breast cancer.

Retired Millersville professor Dr. Dennis Denenberg also had a table to promote the new Diana and Marsha Breast Cancer Awareness Center, located in Millersville University’s Health Services building. The Center is dedicated to Diana, Denenberg’s late sister, and Marsha, the late wife of retired Millersville administrator and professor Dr. Richard Frerichs who battled long fights with breast cancer.
Diana, a Millersville University alumni, was the Editor-in-Chief of the Snapper in 1967. After graduating in 1967, she worked for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA ). In 1989, she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Following a mastectomy and chemotherapy, she was cancer free for five years before it came back. In 2005 she was deemed cancer free, but the cancer returned and she passed away in 2007.
Marsha graduated from Pennsylvania State University where she was part of the golf and equestrian teams. She married Dr. Frerichs in 1978, worked as the director of Elderhostel Program at Millersville, coached her daughters soccer teams and was head coach of the Penn Manor High School golf team. In 1994, Marsha was diagnosed with breast cancer. She underwent successful chemotherapy treatments, but the cancer returned in 2002. Multiple chemo and radiation treatments and blood tests over the next six years never stopped her from coaching the Penn Manor High School golf team.
There were also several games and activities for students to participate in to raise awareness for breast cancer. Upon arriving at Breast-a-Ville, students were given passports and if they managed to get eleven of the thirteen tables to stamp their passports, they received a free “No Phone Zone” t-shirt.

A student playing the game, ‘Toss the Habit’ at the 2nd annual Breast-a-Ville.
A student playing the game, ‘Toss the Habit’ at the 2nd annual Breast-a-Ville.

Health Services hosted the game Toss the Habit, where students would toss beanbags on a board with bras on them. The Athletic Training club hosted Rack Attack, where students had to stack 36 pink cups in a pyramid in one minute. There was also a game where students could fish rubber ducks out of a small pool with a fishing rod in order to win an assortment of prizes. Millersville University Honors College handed out Dum-Dum lollipops to encourage awareness. Pink sugar cookies and water were also provided to those who attended.
Organizations such as Lancaster General Hospital, Grace Cancer Ministry and Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition were also there to educate, offer support and answer questions about breast health and breast cancer. One organizational table had the display “Know Your Lemons”, which compared lumps in lemons to lumps in breasts and emphasized the importance of breast examinations.
Games, activities and information were plentiful at Breast-a-Ville. The Breast-A-Ville was set in conjunction with Millersville’s 20th annual Wellness Fair, which promoted all things health and wellness. Breast-a-Ville separated itself from the Wellness Fair with pink balloons. Students who missed Breast-a-Ville this year are encouraged to attend it next year.