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The sweetest Super Bowl commercial moments

Christine Illes
Features Writer

Super Bowl Sunday has turned out to be not just the biggest day in football, it has become the biggest day for advertisers. Every year, football fans succumb to the countless commercials advertisers pay millions of dollars to show. Advertisers pay up to four million actually according to Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Every year, there are many who have high hopes for the ads and expect to be entertained. There’s always that one person at a Super Bowl party that arrives says “I’m just here for the commercials.”

Instead of using sexual appeal or humor, the Budweiser commercial “Puppy Love” pulled on the audiences’ heart strings during the Super Bowl.
Instead of using sexual appeal or humor, the Budweiser commercial “Puppy Love” pulled on the audiences’ heart strings during the Super Bowl.

Unfortunately, this year wasn’t the most entertaining when it came to ads. Many tried to take a warm, light-hearted approach when it came to their ads, and there wasn’t too much humor. Of course, there were a few commercials that did stand out. One of the most sweet ads came from Budweiser. Their ad, “Puppy Love,” centered around a puppy at a farm, falling in love with one of the Clydesdale horses. Coca-Cola’s ad also gained a lot of attention for their “America the Beautiful” ad, which embraced diversity by showing a number of different people in many settings of American life while America the Beautiful played in the background, sung in different languages. This sparked a lot of controversy among viewers, not only because the song was sung in different languages, but included a gay couple with their daughter. According to GLAAD, this is the first Super Bowl ad to feature a gay family. Microsoft also took a heartfelt approach with their ad “Empowering,” which centered around the good technology does for society. The ad featured an appearance by former NFL player, Steve Gleason, using technology to communicate with his son. Gleason is suffering from ALS, neurodegenerative disease.
Although there wasn’t many, there were a few advertisements that took a humorous approach. Take Dannon Oiko’s ad “The Spill” which features John Stamos and two of his Full House costars, Bob Saget and Dave Coulier. ’80s celebs like Hulk Hogan, Dee Snyder, Mary Lou Retton, and even Chucky and Alf made an appearance in Radio Shack’s “The Call,” where all these ’80s celebs and more storm in to “take their store back.” Audi also took a comedic approach with their “Doberhuahua” ad, where a couple are having trouble compromising between getting a Doberman or Chihuahua. The pet shop employee suggests breeding them together, which ends up having a disastrous outcome. GoDaddy.com’s “Bodybuilder” ad was funny and a bit disturbing when a large crowd of body builders swarm to a spray tan salon.
Aside from the Full House cast and ’80s stars, there were other celebrity appearances. One came from Jerry Seinfeld, Jason Alexander, and Wayne Knight of Seinfeld, promoting their new web series “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee.” Tim Tebow appeared in a T-mobile ad, and Bob Dylan was the spokesman in Chrysler’s “America’s Import.”
Some other ads included Axe’s romantic “Kiss for Peace,” Chevy’s “Romance,” Dorito’s “Time Machine,” and Subway introduced their new Frito’s Chicken Enchilada Melt in their ad, packed with Olympic athletes.
Many have said that the ads were disappointing this year. Let’s hope that next year’s ads bring a little more entertainment.