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Justin McLaughlin performs junior recital

Allie Remis
Staff Writer

Justin McLaughlin had his junior piano recital assisted by Klaudellsh Larieux Saturday, April 11. McLaughlin is a Music Education major with a concentration in piano, and is a student of Dr. Anita Renfroe. McLaughlin played six songs at his recital starting at 4:30 p.m. The first was “English Suite No. 3” by Johann Sebastian Bach, which was the prelude written in concerto – gross form. The second was a song by Ludwig van Beethoven, and was called “Rage Over a Lost Penny.” This piece had a recurring theme and a faster, more-upbeat tempo compared to his opening song. While it was composed by Beethoven, it was left unfinished and was ultimately published by Anton Diabelli.

The third song was “Suite Op. 15 No. 1” and featured a piano duo with Larieux. This piece is by Anton Arensky, a Russian composer during the 19th century. Having two pianists play at the same time while trading off the melody back and forth, staying in time made this an exciting piece to watch. After the song was finished, Larieux elbowed McLaughlin playfully before they both exited the stage.

Justin McLaughlin (left) performed his junior recital on Saturday, April 11. Klaudellsh Larieux (right) assisted him on piano during some of his pieces. (Allie Remis/Snapper)
Justin McLaughlin (left) performed his junior recital on Saturday, April 11. Klaudellsh Larieux (right) assisted him on piano during some of his pieces. (Allie Remis/Snapper)

After the piano duo, McLaughlin played two songs by Franz Schubert, “Impromptu No.2 in E-Flat Major” and “Impromptu No.3 in G-Flat Major.”The first “Impromptu” was more chromatic and quick with a darker, yet still lyrical, melody while the second Impromptu was a little more relaxed and melodic. The Impromptu’s were published in two sets of four but only the first set was published before Shubert died.

He closed his recital with the “Revolutionary Etude Op. 10 No. 12” by Frédéric Chopin. The word ‘etude’ translates to ‘work’ or ‘exercise,’ which seemed fitting, since this piece was dark and technically difficult, with long lines of notes traveling down the piano. This is a well-known work of Chopin’s, and has historical undertones. After McLaughlin bowed and exited the stage, he came back to sincerely thank everyone for coming and invited guests to a reception in the lobby.

Next week’s recitals include Jason Brennan, Hayden Delia, Rick Ferrarelli and Luke Helker on Sunday, April 19.

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