US Women’s Hockey claims gold

PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA American forward Hilary Knight helped lead Team USA to their first gold medal in ice hockey since the 1998 Games in Nagano, Japan.

Bobby Bader
Photography Editor

The United States of America had won its first Olympic gold medal in women’s ice hockey since the 1998 Winter Games in Nagano, Japan.

Team USA defeated Canada, 3-2 in a six-round shootout to win the gold medal. The victory ended Canada’s golden dominance since the 2002 Games in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson snuck one past Canada with an incredible game winning shootout goal in the sixth round. American goalie Maddie Rooney closed the door on Meghan Agosta at the other end to secure the win.

This matchup between the U.S. and Canada would be the fifth time the rivals have met in the gold medal game since women were allowed to compete at the Olympic level in 1998.

Only the U.S. and Canada have won gold in the women’s Olympic ice hockey tournament.

In a Preliminary game held on February 14, Canada beat the U.S. earlier in Olympic play by a final score of 2-1.

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Going into this game, both teams knew the importance of what was going to be on the line.

The U.S. got on the board late in the first period with a power-play goal from Hilary Knight as she scored her second goal of the tournament. The goal came on the third power play opportunity for the U.S.

Team Canada’s Haley Irwin tied the game at one, as she batted a puck out of mid air on a shot from the point by Blayre Turnbull.

With the game now tied at one, both teams went into desperation mode.

Canada’s captain Marie- Philip Poulin gave her team a 2-1 lead after her wrist shot found the back of the net at 6:55 of the second period.

The goal gave Poulin her fifth overall goal in three Olympic gold-medal game appearances.

Heading into the third period, the U.S. trailed 2-1, but that soon changed as Monique Lamoureux-Morando caught an opportunity on a breakaway to tie the game at 2-2.

The score remained the same for the remainder of the third period.

At the end of regulation, the U.S. and Canada were tied at two apiece.

This would be the fourth time in the past five Olympics that the U.S. and Canada would require extra time to decide the gold medal game.

After going scoreless in the overtime, the game was going to be decided by the dreaded shootout.

Gigi Marvin scored in the first round of the shootout to give the U.S. an early lead but was matched by a goal from Meghan Agosta of Canada in the second round.

Both American Amanda Kessel, and Canadian Melodie Daoust, traded goals in the fourth round of the shootout.

American goalie Maddie Rooney (U.S.) and her Canadian counterpart Shannon Szabados stood on their heads as each made huge stops in the fifth round.

Lamoureux-Davidson knew she has the game on her stick heading into the sixth round of the shootout.

She ended up pulling off one of the nicest dekes in all of hockey, as she beat Szabados to put the U.S. ahead in the shootout.

It all came down to Rooney, who had to make a stop in order to secure her team the gold medal for the first time since 1998.

Rooney’s save ended many years of heartbreak for the Americans.

It was finally time for the Stars and Stripes to shine brightly once again on the Olympic stage.