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Don’t do it, Why burning Nike Merchandise is a bad idea

The Nike brand took a controversial marketing strategy and some fans have responded in a negative manner.

Skyler Meade

Staff Writer

On Labor Day Nike Released a new “Just Do It” Ad featuring a picture of Colin Kaepernick and a quote over the photo that stated “Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything.” Kaepernick was one of the first NFL athletes to take a knee during the national anthem as the protest against inequality and police brutality. After this ad was released there was a huge uproar and retaliation against Nike. People took to Twitter and other Social media platforms to talk about their dissatisfaction with Nike’s new ad.

Which then lead to the burning and destroying of their Nike merchandise. I find this to be all around ridiculous, unnecessary and immature just because you do not agree with something does not mean you have to automatically destroy it all together. There are better and more constructive ways to get rid of things that you do not want other than burning it or destroying it. Tons of people in the world and our communities alone can barely afford a pair of shoes at all or do not have the means to pay thirty dollars for a t-shirt that has “Just Do It” printed on it. So, instead of burning the shoes and the t-shirts why not donate it or sell it instead of practically wasting your hard earned money. Burning the merchandise is doing nothing but wasting. Not to mention it also endangering the people burning the merchandise but also the people around them.

I also believe that Nike had the right idea and their PR team knew exactly what they were doing. Since the release of the Kaepernick ad Nikes stock has skyrocketed and they are in no way losing money. If anything it just roped more people in and everyone just fell for a big publicity stunt. In a few weeks, everyone will be over it, regret burning a pair a hundred and fifty dollar shoes, and will continue shopping for one of the most recognizable brands in the country.