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Chief Anders gives lectures on active shooter training

Chief of the Millersville Police Department, Peter Anders, gave a lecture to MU students and faculty regarding responses in the case of a school shooting. Photo Courtesy of Millersville University

Shaun Lucas

Associate News Editor  

On Sept. 30 and Oct. 1, Chief of the Millersville Police Department Peter Anders lectured MU students and faculty regarding responses in the case of a school shooting. The presentation featured, videos, statistics of past shooting events, and interactive demonstrations, educating individuals on how shooting safety procedures.

MU has a reputation for upholding campus safety. According to the Security Center website, Millersville University is titled one of the safest campuses in Pennsylvania. Many attribute this ranking to the diligence of the MUPD, constantly surveilling the campus and acting as security for MU public events. In addition, the emergency pillars along the campus are available for threatened students. When the students press the “emergency” button, MUPD officers to arrive at the scene within minutes.

Along with officers, MU offers multiple programs for student safety, such as the online “Not Anymore” courses teaching freshmen the dangers of drugs, alcohol, and sexual assault on campus. Several clubs provide interactive learning for the protection benefits, such as the Martial Arts organization teaching students self-defense methods.

The presentation focused on “ALiSE”: alert, lockdown, inform, counter, and evacuate in the case of a public shooting.

The presentation also debunks the common “intruder alert” procedures held by many high schools, with Anders used statistics from the Virginia Tech shooting on April 17, 2007. Through a chilling model of fatalities based on specific campus rooms, Anders analyzed how the room with the most survivors were ones who took actions, rather than those who simply hid from the shooter.

Anders gave a physical demonstration on removing guns from a shooter, with plastic weapon models. Audience members could then learn detailed ways to pressure a shooter into submission until receiving officer aid. Another demonstration involved volunteers moving back and forth, with other audience members attempting to follow the volunteer with their thumb. This activity displayed how moving makes one less likely to be wounded or killed by a shooter.

Mental health and watching for signs were another key concept of the presentation. Anders encouraged individuals to report suspicious messages or behavior. Doing so will assist officers’ ability to investigate and prevent a potential shooting.